5 ways to break your bad habits easily

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Everyone has a vice. Some people have more than one, others have theirs under control, and some people give in to their desires and overindulge. But admitting that your habit is bad for you is only part of the battle, especially if you need to quit for health reasons.

It takes on average 66 days of repetitive actions to break bad habits, and they are most definitely easier to make than break. Chances are, willpower alone might not always be enough to help you kick the habit and make new habits to replace them.

How can you change your bad habits and incorporate new ones into your lifestyle?

Identify Your Triggers

Knowing what triggers initiate your bad habits and tracking your behaviour and responses can be an eye-opening experience. Is there anything in particular that encourages the behaviour? How do you feel at the time, and is there a specific place or other people attached to your triggers.

Once you know more about how and when your habitual behaviours and habits are triggered, you can address them.

Why Do You Want to Change/Stop?

What is your reason you want to break your habitual patterns? Is it for health reasons? Cutting back on junk food to help you live healthier and lose weight? Or maybe you need to quit smoking, whatever it is, make a plan for quitting.

Once you have, you’re why you are ready to address the problem head-on.

Get Support

Making drastic life changes alone can be a daunting experience. Muster support from family and friends and lean on them for support when tackling cravings from smoking withdrawals, for example.

Be open with them about why you want to break the habits and allow them to work with you to put measures in place to break the cycle. 

Swap Your Habit

Instead of simply trying to avoid the bad habit, you might find it easier to break the pattern of behaviour if you substitute it with a new choice.

Let’s say you want to avoid eating candy at work when you’re hungry. You could slip back into the habit if you try to stop the candy dish when you can’t resist hunger. Bringing a Tupperware full of dried fruit and nuts to your desk, on the other hand, gives you another snack choice.

The same applies if you are trying to stop smoking. Giving your mind another option, such as using vape products from VapeLab LND, can help you resist the habit you are trying to break.

The desire to follow the new routine grows as you replicate the new action. After seeing the benefits of the new habit — more energy and no sugar crash — the desire to continue doing this behaviour can eventually outweigh the desire to follow the old habit.

Be Prepared for Slip-Ups

No one is 100% perfect 100% of the time, and it is only natural that you may find you have the odd slip up while trying to break your habit. But allowing yourself to appreciate this can help you avoid falling back into old habits and being too hard on yourself.

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